HIMALAYA – Mountains of Life






Exactly a year ago I spent my time in a remote little mountain range in the Tompotikan peninsula of Sulawesi. Had a great time working with top National Geographic contributor/ ILCP Fellow Kevin Schafer and Indonesia’s top photographer Riza Marlon. Our job was to help Marcy summers of the Alliance for Tompotika Conservation document the biodiversity of the fragile peninsula and bring about some serious convservation before the region gets converted to oil palm and the like.
Here’s a brief link to National Geographic’s Newswatch that explains more about the expedition supported by iLCP’s Tripods in the Mud.

Here’s a short video of the whole expedition edited by Pooja Gupta, this decease a student of Srishti School of Design.

Expedition Tompotika – Sulawesi from Sandesh Kadur on Vimeo.

Endangered
ENDANGERED
Maleo Macrocephalon maleo

The Maleo is a very cool looking ground nesting bird with a distinctive, check remedy bare, bump on its head. We spent time in a hide near one of the nesting beaches that this bird inhabits. Highly endangered this bird is endemic to Sulawesi and nearby islands. It lays its eggs in the sand and allows it to be incubated by solar and in some places geothermal radiation. It was great fun watching this turkey-like bird defend its patch from rivals uttering a guttural, gurgle-like call while chasing away intruders.

Wagler’s Pit Viper – Tropidolaemus wagleri

“An interesting story was told in former days in Indonesia about the species Tropidolaemus wagleri/ It was regarded as a good-natured and laconic animal, which could be seized, at least during daytime, and with which one could play without being bitten. On Sumatra one would even place it in the palm trees on the outer veranda of the house, where it would stay motionless in the same place, sometimes for a month. It would bring good luck to the tenant and children would even wear it as a necklace! Because of its kind-heartedness it was known as “Ular Cinta Manis”, the loveable, sweet snake.People believed that birds came to pay tribute and bring food for the holy snake. Other people believed that, because of its almost invisible daily activity, it would live on air” (Delsman, 1951)

Endangered

ENDANGERED
Maleo Macrocephalon maleo

The Maleo is a very cool looking ground nesting bird with a distinctive, remedy bare, bump on its head. We spent time in a hide near one of the nesting beaches that this bird inhabits. Highly endangered this bird is endemic to Sulawesi and nearby islands. It lays its eggs in the sand and allows it to be incubated by solar and in some places geothermal radiation. It was great fun watching this turkey-like bird defend its patch from rivals uttering a guttural, gurgle-like call while chasing away intruders.

[caption id="attachment_1475" align="alignleft" width="900"] Wagler’s Pit Viper – Tropidolaemus wagleri

“An interesting story was told in former days in Indonesia about the species Tropidolaemus wagleri/ It was regarded as a good-natured and laconic animal, which could be seized, at least during daytime, and with which one could play without being bitten. On Sumatra one would even place it in the palm trees on the outer veranda of the house, where it would stay motionless in the same place, sometimes for a month. It would bring good luck to the tenant and children would even wear it as a necklace! Because of its kind-heartedness it was known as “Ular Cinta Manis”, the loveable, sweet snake.People believed that birds came to pay tribute and bring food for the holy snake. Other people believed that, because of its almost invisible daily activity, it would live on air” (Delsman, 1951)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the end of the day what we do is help build awareness in places where although high in species and biodiversity, the local people would have little knowledge, access, or appreciation of what lives around them. Perhaps if we could get more people to ‘see’ whats around them, they would appreciate, value and thereby ‘want’ to protect what’s left.
For more information and to support the work of The Alliance for Tompotika Conservation / Aliansi Konservasi Tompotika (AlTo) visit their website: www.tompotika.org

 

Pages: 306

List Price: Rs. 3500
Offer Price: Rs. 3000
You save: Rs. 500!

Binding : Hardcover
Publisher: Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment;
1st edition: January, ailment
2013

Language: English
ISBN:978-1-61584-512-5
Product Dimensions: 12.2 x 11 x 1.1 inches
Shipping Weight: 4.4 pounds

HIMALAYA – MOUNTAINS OF LIFE

From the great canyon of Yarlung Tsangpo and the Siang Gorge in the east to the Kali Gandaki Gorge in the west, viagra
the Eastern Himalaya encompasses within its vast realm, dysentery
ancient mountain kingdoms, forested valleys and snow-covered peaks – all in a relatively young landscape, still growing, higher and more enigmatic each day. Within its rugged folds lay many mysteries, new species, primeval cultures and the promise of magical cures to heal all humanity. No doubt, the greatest mountain range on earth the Himalaya hides many treasures.

This book attempts to unravel these treasures and showcase what lays hidden to the cursory eye with the hope that some value is added to our biocultural treasures which otherwise, will certainly disappear. Himalaya, takes us on a journey through these Mountains of Life and tells us why preserving this heritage is important, not just for us, but for the future of all life on earth.

“From the plains of the Brahmaputra River, the home of the Great Indian Rhinoceros, up through the evergreen and coniferous forests to the alpine meadows, and finally to the sublime peaks and glaciers, this book celebrates scenic splendor and the glorious variety of plants and animals.”

George Schaller Panthera and Wildlife Conservation Society

“The text and photographs of this book capture the sheer beauty of the Himalaya at every scale, from the intricate detail of a moth’s wing to the sweep of vast alpine landscapes.”

Rohini Nilekani Chairperson, Arghyam

“Through the combination of visual and textual material, readers will be able to understand the richness of Eastern Himalayan life and the importance of conserving it—both for its own sake and because it collectively forms the basis for continued human existence.”

Peter Raven Missouri Botanical Garden

Purchase Online


INDIA ORDERS

US / UK ORDERS