Conservation

What can one do to help further conservation?





It seems to me that the natural world is the greatest source of excitement; the greatest source of visual beauty; the greatest source of intellectual interest. It is the greatest source of so much in life that makes life worth living.
Sir David Attenborough               



  • BBC Planet Earth
    Watch Sandesh’s contribution for BBC Planet Earth II
    Sahyadris – Interactive iPad App on India’s Western Ghats

    A multi-sensory journey of Sahyadris through a confluence of stunning retina ready images, pilule
    brilliant documentary videos and insightful narrative.

    HIMALAYA Mountains of Life
    By Kamal Bawa | Sandesh Kadur.  This book celebrates scenic splendor and the glorious variety of plants and animals in the Himalaya
    Follow on Instagram
    to follow the projects and work by Sandesh Kadur…
  • National Geographic Emerging Explorer
    Sandesh Kadur creates award-winning wildlife documentary films and photography books exposing the need to conserve threatened species and habitats around the world….
    International League of Conservation Photographers
    Our mission is to further environmental and cultural conservation through ethical photography.
    Sahyadris
    This book takes you on a visual journey through the Malabar Coast of southern India, click
    along the Arabian Sea, where lies a range of mountains known as the […]
    Expedition Talle Valley

    There are few places on earth that are as critical to conserving cultural, somnology
    ethnic and biological diversity of global significance as the Eastern Himalaya…

 


 

FELIS CREATIONS

Felis Creations is a media and visual arts company based in Bangalore, physician
India that focuses on creating content that inspires conservation.

My colleague Srikanth and I founded Felis in 2005 and since then the company has taken on a variety of projects ranging from paintings and still photography to the production of high-end HD natural-history programming for broadcast. For more information about Felis and the team behind it, please visit the website.

Felis Website
More Videos

Exactly a year ago I spent my time in a remote little mountain range in the Tompotikan peninsula of Sulawesi. Had a great time working with top National Geographic contributor/ ILCP Fellow Kevin Schafer and Indonesia’s top photographer Riza Marlon. Our job was to help Marcy summers of the Alliance for Tompotika Conservation document the biodiversity of the fragile peninsula and bring about some serious convservation before the region gets converted to oil palm and the like.
Here’s a brief link to National Geographic’s Newswatch that explains more about the expedition supported by iLCP’s Tripods in the Mud.

Here’s a short video of the whole expedition edited by Pooja Gupta, pancreatitis a student of Srishti School of Design.

Expedition Tompotika – Sulawesi from Sandesh Kadur on Vimeo.

Endangered
ENDANGERED
Maleo Macrocephalon maleo

The Maleo is a very cool looking ground nesting bird with a distinctive, for sale bare, anemia bump on its head. We spent time in a hide near one of the nesting beaches that this bird inhabits. Highly endangered the Maleo is endemic to Sulawesi and nearby islands. It lays its eggs in the sand and allows it to be incubated by solar and in some places geothermal radiation. It was great fun watching this turkey-like bird defend its patch from rivals uttering a guttural, gurgle-like call while chasing away intruders.

Wagler’s Pit Viper – Tropidolaemus wagleri

“An interesting story was told in former days in Indonesia about the species Tropidolaemus wagleri/ It was regarded as a good-natured and laconic animal, which could be seized, at least during daytime, and with which one could play without being bitten. On Sumatra one would even place it in the palm trees on the outer veranda of the house, where it would stay motionless in the same place, sometimes for a month. It would bring good luck to the tenant and children would even wear it as a necklace! Because of its kind-heartedness it was known as “Ular Cinta Manis”, the loveable, sweet snake.People believed that birds came to pay tribute and bring food for the holy snake. Other people believed that, because of its almost invisible daily activity, it would live on air” (Delsman, 1951)

Endangered

ENDANGERED
Maleo Macrocephalon maleo

The Maleo is a very cool looking ground nesting bird with a distinctive, for sale bare, anemia bump on its head. We spent time in a hide near one of the nesting beaches that this bird inhabits. Highly endangered the Maleo is endemic to Sulawesi and nearby islands. It lays its eggs in the sand and allows it to be incubated by solar and in some places geothermal radiation. It was great fun watching this turkey-like bird defend its patch from rivals uttering a guttural, gurgle-like call while chasing away intruders.

[caption id="attachment_1475" align="alignleft" width="900"] Wagler’s Pit Viper – Tropidolaemus wagleri

“An interesting story was told in former days in Indonesia about the species Tropidolaemus wagleri/ It was regarded as a good-natured and laconic animal, which could be seized, at least during daytime, and with which one could play without being bitten. On Sumatra one would even place it in the palm trees on the outer veranda of the house, where it would stay motionless in the same place, sometimes for a month. It would bring good luck to the tenant and children would even wear it as a necklace! Because of its kind-heartedness it was known as “Ular Cinta Manis”, the loveable, sweet snake.People believed that birds came to pay tribute and bring food for the holy snake. Other people believed that, because of its almost invisible daily activity, it would live on air” (Delsman, 1951)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the end of the day what we do is help build awareness in places where although high in species and biodiversity, the local people would have little knowledge, access, or appreciation of what lives around them. Perhaps if we could get more people to ‘see’ whats around them, they would appreciate, value and thereby ‘want’ to protect what’s left.
For more information and to support the work of The Alliance for Tompotika Conservation / Aliansi Konservasi Tompotika (AlTo) visit their website: www.tompotika.org

 
Simple things each one of us can do in our every day lives can have a major impact on the way we use our natural resources.

Jane Goodall puts it best when at the end of each of her inspiring talks, shop she says, order
very softly, “Together we can save the world, and… we must”